Tropix & Oxilo Heat Up Summer with Out of Love Remix

In February of this year, Two Friends and Cosmos & Creator released “Out of Love” on Spinnin’ Records. A saxophone serenade and a chorus of “Ohs” made it an instant hit and spawned numerous remixes. Cosmos & Creator hail from Toluca Lake, a neighborhood in Los Angeles, and Two Friends (duo Matt Halper + Eli Sones) also call Los Angeles home. The LA trifecta was completed when LA resident and producer Oxilo teamed up with East Coasters Dex and Dylan, who make up Tronix, to remix “Out of Love.” Today we take a look at one of the hottest remixes of the summer that will be sure to hype up your poolside parties and light up your dj sets.

 

Oxilo’s productions range from the more melodic, chill side of bass music to trap and dubstep. In this remix for “Out of Love,” his presence and influence can be felt. The remix employs claps, a funky breakdown, and the familiar sound of Mario breaking a brick to find a coin breathes new life into the original.

The remix was officially released on July 10, 2017, and in just six days it amassed over 10,000 plays. This comes on the heels of a logo makeover and sound makeover for Dex and Dylan. The producer pair had the following to say about their relaunch:

 

“We are excited to introduce the world to our melodic future sounds, and sharing the love of music with our fans in the diaspora. We are committed to creating good feelings to identify our greatest moments together.”

 

Tropix’s music is traveling the world and the pair has plans to take people on the musical journey with them. Download the Tropix and Oxilo’s “Out of Love” remix at http://bit.ly/2tMFZkm and heart on Hype Machine at http://bit.ly/2eWsBrg. Check out Tropix’s and Oxilo’s socials below.

 

TROPIX SOCIALS

OXILO SOCIALS

What Are the Real Names of These Top DJ’s

Most people call him Dubfire, his inner circle calls him by his real name, Ali…but me, I gracefully yell out a simple “hey, uh! Your set was awesome!” after I drunkenly spot him at an after hours club, running giddily towards the DJ booth as his bodyguard looks back and glares at me for my failed attempt to make contact.

But I’m in a club, I’m energetic, I’m sociable. I will not stop until I have commended him on the amazing 2-hour set I watched him mix live just a few hours prior.

Minutes later, inebriated me decides to take to Instagram. I start the comment with the greeting, “Hey Mr. Fire” and send him my best wishes for the evening. I am proud of this nickname I have spontaneously bestowed upon him.

Too proud, in fact, that I don’t stop to think about his real name. In retrospect, I begin to wonder where Mr. Fire got his stage name. I guess I can kind of  see where he got Dubfire from Ali Shirazinia.


There’s no set pattern with electronic DJ’s and their stage names. The genre of the DJ won’t be an indication. Sometimes they simply choose to use their real names (like Joseph Capriati, Armin, Carl, etc). Other times, they dress up as 1/3rd of a s’mores, pretend they’re actually Tiesto and call it a day.

With some, the choice is obvious. Take Claude Vonstroke for instance. Even though his stage name definitely belongs in ‘70s mustache porn, I’m sure even then he thought it would be better than going by his birth name, Barclay Macbride Crenshaw. (Say that 5 times fast.)

If you want to have some real fun twisting your tongue, try imagining the unlucky MC introducing Swedish House Mafia by their real names, “Welcome Steven Angello Josefsson, Axel Christofer Hedfors and Sebastian Ingrosso!!!!!” The crowd would likely go confused before going wild.

Not unlike strippers, I’m sure DJs have fun with stage names. I never sat down and considered what Eric Prydz might have in common with an “exotic dancer”, but now I know the excitement of taking on a different persona if only for a few hours.

Eric Prydz, my favorite man of many names, who is known primarily by his real name also utilizes two aliases to differentiate between genres. Most of the tracks are released under the name Pryda will be more on the progressive house side of things. Tracks under his real name will tend to be more commercial and radio-friendly. And when you least expect it during a Prydz show, his alias Cirez D will emerge with dark, progressive tech-house (swoon).

This is what the first 10 of MixMag’s top 100 DJs list would look like if everyone used their real names. See how many you know.

 

I would rather see how many of these names I can butcher.

  1. Martin Garritsen (Martin Garrix)
  2. Dimitri and Michael Thivaios (Dimitri and Like Mike)
  3. Robbert van de Corput (Hardwell)
  4. Armin Van Buuren
  5. Tijs Michiel Verwest (Tiesto)
  6. David Pierre Guetta
  7. Steven Hiroyuki Aoki
  8. Olivier Heldens
  9. Sonny Moore (Skrillex)
  10. Nick van de Wall (Afrojack)

 

 

And no. No response from Mr. Fire…yet.

3 Common Stereotypes DJs Face

We all might have heard the saying “Don’t judge a book by its cover, ” but in reality, it’s a part of our daily life. Every day someone gets judged because of assumptions that are not entirely accurate, which over the time eventually lead to stereotypes. Stereotyping can be seen in many different ways. As being part of the rave community, I know this way too well. But today we are going to talk about The typical stereotypes DJ’s face.

  1. DJ’s Aren’t Real Musicians

This is another misconception that needs to be put to bed because DJing is not just pressing a button. In fact, as a DJ you need to have the fundamental knowledge of BPM (beats per minute) for beat matching and various music styles. In short, a DJ is the compendium of music.2. As a DJ you need to be technologically savvy.

2. DJ’s Aren’t Technologically Savvy 

As a matter of fact, DJs are very savvy when it comes to technology just because of their industry standards, which require music programs that update pretty often. It would be hard to keep up if they are not technologically up to date with new music software’s, CDJ’s and so on.

3. Being DJ Is a Man’s Game

This is the most common stereotype that not only pertain to the DJ industry, but this gender discrimination has been deep rooted from Wall Street in NY to Shibuya Crossing in Tokyo. There aren’t many female artists that have made it to the top in the industry, but we have to stop this gender discrimination just because she happens to be a girl.